Until the early 1970s, Darlaston town centre had a wide variety of shops which were very popular. It was always an enjoyable experience meeting the friendly shopkeepers, who once provided an important service to the local community. Many of them will be fondly remembered for years to come.
King Street in the 1960s


The bottom of King Street looking into The Bull Stake and Pinfold Street. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


A busy day in King Street in 1966. Courtesy of Darlaston Rotary Club.


A similar view from 1965. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


Kingston's butcher's shop and its once-familiar neighbours. Courtesy of the late Howard Madeley.


Bedworths, arguably Darlaston's first supermarket. Courtesy of the late Howard Madeley.


The large variety of products on sale in Bedworths. Courtesy of the late Howard Madeley.

A payments book for Howard Bros, a radio, television, and record shop that was next door to Bedworths.


A quiet day in King Street, possibly a Sunday. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


The top end of King Street. By this time, John Adey, the well-known butcher had left his shop on the corner of High Street and moved across the road into High Street. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.

Looking back towards High Street with the Dog and Partridge pub, and Stanbury's drapers, milliners, and gents' outfitters shop in the centre. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.

The top of King Street from High Street, looking towards Church Street and Victoria Road. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.

Looking down King Street with High Street on the right. On the left is Darlaston's premier shoe shop, J. T. Underwood. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.

Darlaston's marvellous ironmonger, J. W. Baker & Company Limited, part of the Owen Group. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.

The top of King Street looking towards Victoria Road. Paynes were in the shop for many years, and offered an excellent shoe repair service. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


Looking into King Street from the corner of Victoria Road. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


The once well known White Lion pub at the top of King Street.


Another view looking into King Street from the corner of Victoria Road.

King Street in the 1970s


Looking into King Street from The Bull Stake in about 1970.


The lower part of King Street in the early 1970s. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John & Christine Ashmore.


Another early 1970s view, with the recently built Liptons store across the road.


Looking up King Street at the once well-known shops. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John & Christine Ashmore.


The bottom of King Street looking towards The Bull Stake on a wet Sunday morning.


King Street on the same wet Sunday morning in the early 1970s.


In the mid 1970s trade suffered, and shops began to close. Many shops on the other side of King Street were empty or had been demolished in readiness for the new ASDA store, and the soon to be redeveloped High Street.


Another view from the mid 1970s. Underwoods is about to close, Stantons and Burtons have gone.


Darlaston's once well-known carpet shop, and Wood's television shop.

High Street


Looking from the end of High Street towards Burton's tailors shop in King Street. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


A similar view from across the road. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


A fine view of the Bull's Head and the middle of High Street. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John & Christine Ashmore.

Looking down High Street towards King Street with the well known Spinning Wheels toy and model shop on the left. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.

A view of High Street from the early 1970s showing the row of recently completed shops. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John & Christine Ashmore.
The Bull Stake and Pinfold Street


Looking towards The Bull Stake from the end of Darlaston Road in 1965. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


The Bull Stake in about 1970.


The Bull Stake in about 1973 after the building of St. Lawrence Way.


Two well-known shops in Pinfold Street, Boynton's butchers, and Len Mitchell's radio, TV and cycles shop.


Two more of Len Mitchell's popular Pinfold Street shops.


A business card.


More of the old shops in Pinfold Street. On the left is photographer, Len Bayley's shop, with Toppers' snack bar, sweets, cigarettes, and tobacco shop next door. To the right is W. M. Smith's fish and Chip shop, and on the far right is the Wolverhampton Steam Laundry.


In the centre is the Black Horse pub, the favourite venue of Darlaston's horse racing fraternity.


On the left is the door leading to the old Wesleyan School. In the centre is R. Tedstone's carpet shop with Gladys' Corner Shop on the end to the right. She sold all kinds of household items and ornaments. This was taken just before the completion of St. Lawrence Way.

Pinfold Street in 1970. On the left is the Wesleyan Chapel and the Wesleyan School, both of which were soon to be demolished.

Pinfold Street and St Lawrence Way. Before the building of the library and car park. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John & Christine Ashmore.
St. Lawrence Way and Victoria Road

The United Methodist Church that stood in Great Croft Street. The photograph was taken after the opening of St. Lawrence Way. The church was demolished when the new bus stops were built after the opening of the ASDA store.

The car park and the backs of the shops in King Street that can also be seen on the previous photograph. Taken by Richard Ashmore. Courtesy of John & Christine Ashmore.


Looking into Victoria Road from Church Street in the early 1970s.


The end of Victoria Road in 1965. Courtesy of Bill Beddow.


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