Wolverhampton's Blue Plaques

North St., Paternoster Row, Exchange St., St. Peter's Church & the Civic Centre


The view looking down North Street from Queen Square. The building in the distance is the old Town Hall, which is now occupied by the magistrates' courts. It was built in between 1869 and 1871, in the style of a French Chateau. The building was designed by Manchester architect Mr. E. Bates and was constructed by Philip Horsman of Wolverhampton.
Commemorating:

G. R. Thorne who was the last Liberal Mayor from 1902 to 1903

Sponsored by:

Richard Whitehouse, Liberal Democratic Mayor, 1993-4

Location:

North Street, on the side of Edwards pub.

Edwards Public House, showing the plaque.
Commemorating:

Sir Charles Arthur Mander, Second Baronet.

Sponsored by:

 

Location:

North Street, on the front of the Magistrates' Courts.

The front of the Magistrates' Courts showing the plaque.
Commemorating:

Emma Sproson, Wolverhampton's first woman councillor.

Sponsored by:

Labour Party members

Location:

North Street, on the front of the Magistrates' Courts.

Emma Sproson was born Emma Lloyd in 1867.  She married Frank Sproson in 1896 and had three children.  She was a very active member of the Indpendent Labour Party and of the suffragette movement.  She was imprisoned several times.

Emma left the party in a split in 1927, stood as an Independent Socialist but lost.  Her public career ended and she died as a recluse.

The front of the Magistrates' Courts showing the plaque.  This was the Town Hall during Emma's time as a councillor.

Commemorating:

Arnold Richardson, Borough Organist from 1938 to 1973.

Sponsored by:

Roy Wheeler.

Location:

North Street, on the front of the Civic Hall.

The Civic Hall, with the plaque on the extreme left.
Commemorating:
Francis Smith, architect.

Sponsored by:
Michael Rix.

Location:
North Street, on the front of Giffard House.

Giffard House, showing the plaque above the front door. 

Peter Giffard of Chillington decided to replace his town house with a larger building which became known as Giffard House. It was built between 1727 and 1734 by William Hollis, and was designed by Warwick architect, Francis Smith, who was doing some work at Chillington at the time.  When completed the house and chapel were handed over to the Roman Catholic authorities, who still continue to use it today. 

Commemorating:

John Milner who was the first Catholic Bishop of Wolverhampton from 1803 to 1826.

Sponsored by:

Pat Reidy

Location:

Paternoster Row, On the side of the Chapel of St. Peter & St. Paul.

The photograph shows the plaque on the side of the chapel. 

Bishop Milner lived at Giffard house from 1803 until his death in 1826. The chapel was originally situated inside the house and was extended in 1813. Bishop Milner decided to build an external chapel and set aside £1,000 for the project. Unfortunately he died before work on the new chapel could begin. He is buried behind the chapel, inside the house.

Commemorating:
Button Gwinnett was Governor of Georgia, and a signatory of the Declaration of Independence.

Sponsored by:
Daughters of the American Revolution

Location:
Exchange Street, on the side of St. Peter's House.

Button Gwinnett, who was a merchant from Bristol, lived in Wolverhampton from 1755 to 1762. He married Anne Bourne in 1757 and moved to America in 1762.
St. Peter's house was built in 1852 by Richard Cope, and was immediately sold to George Cope for £2,000. George was the wine merchant who owned and ran Copes Wine Lodge in Queen Square. The house was purchased by St. Peter's Church in 1974, and the ground floor is used as a tea shop. The Town Centre Team Ministry uses the house for its work with some of the district churches.


St. Peter's House showing the plaque.

Commemorating:

Dame Maggie Teyte who was an international singer.

Sponsored by:

Rita and Garry O'Connnor, and David Tron.

Location:

Exchange Street.

The plaque is situated on the building that is opposite the old Bird-In-Hand Yard.

Dame Maggie Teyte was one of the great opera singers of the 20th Century. Her father, owned the Old Still Inn in King Street. She was sent to the Royal College of Music and later studied in Paris under Jean de Reszke. In 1908 she was selected to sing the title role Melisande at the Opera de Commique in Paris. This was the start of a career which was to last for nearly 60 years.

Commemorating:

St. Peter's Church millennium in 1994.

Sponsored by:

Wolverhampton Civic Society.

Location:

Inside the porch of St. Peter's Church.

St. Peter's Church porch.

In 994 Lady Wulfruna endowed the minister church which was originally dedicated to St. Mary, with extensive land. Just over a century later the church was dedicated to St. Peter & St. Paul, and then to St. Peter alone.

The church was served by a college of secular canons and had the status of a Royal free chapel. After the Norman conquest, King William granted the church to his chaplain, Samson of Bayeux. Most of the present church dates from the rebuilding in the mid and late fifteenth century. The Chancel, designed by Ewan Christian was completed in 1865.

Commemorating:

The millennium and the achievement of city status

Sponsored by:

Wolverhampton City Council

Location:

The Civic Centre

The plaque is situated on the left-hand side of the main entrance to the Civic Centre. It was unveiled by the Mayor, Joyce Hill.